Using Your Physical Signage to Improve Your Online Presence


digital signage onlineYour business sign says a lot about you and your company; it’s your brand. The more you use it, the more people will recognize you. Unfortunately, many small and medium-sized businesses don’t understand the value of taking physical business signage and translating it to the web.

You’ve already paid for the custom design, so you should use it. In the end, it’ll only improve your brand.

It’s Your Website Banner

The most obvious place to use a representation of your physical signage online is your website. A web developer and designer can create a duplicate of your business sign and put it on your website, which creates congruency between your offline and online business.

Related: Work with one of our web design specialists to get started

Chances are you’re not moving your company online completely. Your existing customers need to see your sign online so that they know it’s you when they come across your website; especially if you’re new to the online world.

Social Media Profiles

Social networks like LinkedIn and Facebook are great places to use a replica of your business sign. Users that find you on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or any other social networking site may be confused if your logo is different than the one they’ve seen at your bricks and mortar location. This is not only beneficial for your customers, but your business as well.

  • Reusing your existing logo means that you save yourself time and money in design costs. Since social media is, by nature, social, this is the last place you want to go monkeying around with your business signage.

Email Communications

It’s become pretty standard for companies to include their logo in emails. It’s an easy way to identify who the email is coming from, confirms that someone from the company is contacting them, and creates one more point of congruency between your physical store and the online world.

Related: 5 Steps to Making Your Email Signature a Marketing Tool

If you plan to do the same, be sure to place the logo at the bottom of every email correspondence. Most email programs have the option of appending a permanent signature to the email message. If your email program allows for this, do it. Once you’ve appended a signature containing your logo, you don’t have to copy and paste anything beyond the first email. Each time you send a new email message, your brand will show up at the bottom of the email.

Advertisements

Online advertisements should always be branded with your logo when appropriate. Some ad platforms do not allow for this, but many do – especially banner advertisements and full-page online ads.  If you’re ad is showing up in searches and various places across the web, you want to be recognized.

Related: Speak with a PPC vendor to start online marketing the right way

Online companies don’t have to worry about moving their physical signage online, but they employ the same kind of branding strategies you’ve been using for many years at your physical location. Don’t think of the Internet as a brand new start for your business branding. It’s just another advertising medium like newspapers, magazines, and television. You put your brand everywhere else. Don’t forget to put it online.

Bio: Scott Quinlan is a business branding consultant. His articles mainly appear in business marketing blogs where he enjoys sharing his tips and insights. Visit Impact Signs for more branding ideas.


Business.com Editorial Staff

Business.com Editorial Staff

Author's Website: http://www.business.com

Author's Social Links: Author Google Plus Profile Link Author Facebook Profile Link Author Twitter Profile Link Author LinkedIn Profile Link

The Business.com Editorial Staff writes on topics relevant to small and medium-sized business (SMB) owners. Posts cover best practices, top tips, and studies that deliver insights specific to SMBs.

Our team has backgrounds in journalism, English, philosophy, marketing, entrepreneurship and management, providing us the opportunity to share unique viewpoints on all things affecting small and medium-sized businesses.


View Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>