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Find resources for and about minority-owned businesses. Research providers of minority-owned business grants and and loans. Identify companies offering minority business certification services and minority business development tools.

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Minority-Owned Businesses Key Terms

Minority-owned businesses are multiplying faster than any other kind of individual and joint business ventures in the United States today. Like any emerging market, minority-owned businesses encounter unique challenges, such as how to attract equity investors and how to find cost-effective advertising solutions.

Minority-Owned Business Classification

There's a multibillion-dollar pie that comes from government and corporate contracts targeted to minority-owned businesses. A variety of federal, state and local government agencies offer minority business certification programs in an effort to help businesses qualify.

Making the Most of Minority-Owned Businesses

Making the most of minority-owned businesses means fully utilizing resources designed for people of color and women-owned companies. You can gain valuable support from agencies set up to foster minority business development.

Minority-Owned Businesses | The US Small Business Administration

SBA's 8(a) Business Development program can help qualifying minority-owned firms develop and grow their businesses through one-to-one counseling, training  ...

Minority Business Development Agency

Federal agency promoting the growth of businesses owned by ethnic minorities. Register on-line for assistance with capital formation, marketing and ...

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Minority business enterprise - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) is an American term which is defined as a business which is at least 51% owned, operated and controlled on a daily basis ...

How to Get Certified as a Minority-Owned Business | Inc.com

May 19, 2010 ... Having a minority-owned business certification can help you tap into a bevy of public and private sector programs. Here's how to apply.

Division of Minority and Women's Business Development

Welcome to the Division of Minority and Women's Business Development ... and opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses throughout the State.

Virginia Department of Minority Business Enterprise

We are the state agency dedicated to enhancing the participation of our small, women- and minority-owned businesses in Virginia's procurement process.

- Minority Business Certification, Women's Business Certification ...

A minority-owned business is defined as being owned, capitalized, operated and controlled by a member of an identified minority group. The business must be a ...

MWBE.com - National Resource and Referral Site for Minority and ...

Most certifications are granted for Minority or Women owned businesses, Small Disadvantaged Businesses, and Underutilized businesses. Certification ...

Office of Minority, Women and Emerging Small ... - Business Oregon

As the sole certification authority in Oregon, OMWESB provides a “one-stop” certification process for Oregon disadvantaged, minority- and woman-owned and  ...

Training for Minority-Owned Businesses


Training for minority-owned businesses is essential to help develop companies run by women and people of color. Technical assistance, entrepreneurial support and capacity building are critical to sustain and grow companies owned by minorities. Additionally, education about accessing minority business grants and minority-owned business loans helps facilitate businesses' success.

Resources exist for minority-owned companies, such as black-owned businesses. Knowing where to find these assets is one way to obtain support. Other ways include investing in educational opportunities, applying for grants or loans and reading publications about minority business development.

1. Attend training programs aimed at entrepreneurs such as minority business owners.

2. Expand finances through grants and loans aimed at minority business development.

3. Study articles focused on improving management skills of minority-owned businesses.

Pursue post-secondary education and other forms of training for minority-owned businesses

Explore curricula for courses on management, operations, finance, minority-run companies and other entrepreneurial disciplines. Look for programs with a history of successfully training individuals for business ownership. Inquire about online courses to attend classes virtually anywhere.
SMU Cox School of Business. Sign up for their Master of Science in Entrepreneurship program. This 16-month curriculum offers weekend and evening courses. Maximize your business knowledge through training at Indiana University. Learn how to gain minority business certification and other resources to support minority-owned companies.

Review newsletters with information supporting minority-owned businesses

Read articles about the challenges and successes of individuals who operate a minority-owned business. Sign up for newsletters to receive regular updates on issues affecting management. Study periodicals designed for women and ethnic minority business owners.

Pinpoint funding sources for minority-owned business grants

Work with companies who provide grants for minority-owned businesses or who connect you with funding sources to apply for business loans or grants. Look for businesses that accommodate business owners through regional or local offices and through online support.
U.S. Small Business Administration that supports small business owners who often operate minority-owned companies. The SBIC helps facilitate the flow of capital and loans to individuals who run small businesses. Communicate with the Minority Business Development Agency, a U.S. Department of Commerce program, for a comprehensive overview of financing issues related to minority and small business owners.
  • Use caution with companies that advertise free grant funds for minority business owners. These companies often ask consumers to buy products such as software or publications prior to giving information about free funds.