How would you deliver an elevator pitch in 2 minutes?

I want to start a monthly-subscription delivery box of best seller books. I have been invited to a sales seminar in New York at the end of the month. This is a great opportunity for me to speak about my business and meet potential investors. In the event program it says, be prepared to sell your business in 2 minutes or less. I've never crafted an elevator pitch before, where do I begin? Thank you!

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An “Elevator Pitch” will be invaluable for your burgeoning business Erica, not just at the conference you are attending but at every encounter you have when the “what is it that you do” question pops up.

A well-constructed and rehearsed Elevator Pitch is important because it more often forms the first impression that you have the opportunity to make. It can literally start a rewarding conversation or as effectively end one!

2 minutes is longer than most people’s attention span (even the polite ones), so you really need to be capable of nailing it in about 30 seconds, no more than 1 minute.

The template that Wayne suggested forms a sound starting point as it identifies many of the elements essential to your pitch and arranges them in a practical order. However, because so many people follow this format, it does create what can very easily become a commodity approach, often making you sound a little clichéd or scripted. So once you have the suggested building blocks and flow in place there are three critical elements that need to be imbedded to differentiate and make your response more interesting, plus ensure that your pitch’s content draws the reaction you seek.

The first magic ingredient is “personality,” this may sound obvious, but a significant proportion of the people you meet will appear (at least initially) to have none! Your personality, appearance and mannerisms will essentially manifest your enterprise’s culture. It can be carefree or even dower, but it must be relevant and appropriate to your business and the market it serves. Will your pitch make them laugh, or at least smile? Will it at least endear your commercial objectives and establish a common context for a future business relationship? Your personality must be front and centre otherwise your pitch can not generate any lasting attention or rewards.

The second essential component is making certain that whatever you say evokes the response you desire. Usually you will want your listener to say something like, “how do you achieve that?” or “Fascinating; I would love to know more.” These types or responses are what’s required if your elevator pitch is ever to have a genuine purpose. Like any introduction your pitch is primarily a mechanism that’s purpose is to enable to something else. That destination is most likely to be a conversation on how the person you have just met can contribute to or facilitate your businesses’ financial wellbeing.

The final third element is what you say to remain memorable, and cut through all those other well-crafted pitches listeners will find themselves bombarded with. This is commonly the elusive component that most people struggle with. But when you nail this element your pitch will have everyone coming back to learn more; and isn’t that the objective?

Staying within the acceptable bounds of your culture and industry, how far can you go to be memorably different? Should you be a little shocking, contentious, outspoken, bombastically confident or even philanthropic? What extreme or impressive claim can you make, that you can convincingly justify when asked to explain? What powerful statement can you make that your listeners’ could repeat when describing who they just met to a college? What’s your key message that will ring in your listeners’ ears in the hours and days following your first 30+ second encounter?

This usually challenging final component will set you apart from all the others who have developed their pitch to a formula, and will likely be all but forgotten when the event where they met is over.

4

It's all in thinking through all the best things to say, and putting them in the right format. Figure out how you are unique, what the hot buttons of your prospects are (think: fears, frustrations, wants, aspirations), and then put it all together in a format that is POWERFUL. Two suggestions:
(1) review a recording of a free online training event I did entitled "How to Create KILLER Marketing Messages" http://bit.ly/23y5dCs
(2) if you struggle with you elevator pitch, just fill in the blanks with this template: http://bit.ly/2mMUmAz

If I can help, let me know.

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