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Personality Disorders that Get You Hired

ByGrant Reinero,
business.com writer
|
Oct 01, 2014
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> Business Basics
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The modern workplace is a demanding environment that requires employees to perform in highly specialized positions. The market for these jobs has become intensely competitive leading employers to look beyond traditional qualifications. Personal attributes once considered too taboo to discuss are now potential differentiators. Personality disorders may no longer be something to hide but rather a point of pride for applicants who need their resumes to standout.

Whether you have been clinically diagnosed with a personality disorder or just suspect that you might have one, it is important to know what careers best suit your particular mental illness.

The following resource provides guidance for those looking to parlay their craziness into crazy career opportunities:

1. Narcissist

Narcissistic Personality Disorder is characterized by a pattern of grandiosity, an overwhelming need for admiration, and usually a lack of empathy toward others.

Best Use: This disorder lends itself to positions of authority and is generally found in C-level executives. While individuals with this trait often excel in upper management and lead their organizations to great profits, most companies would not openly admit to looking for a narcissist. For this reason, alternate self-descriptions or phrases can be useful, such as: ‘purpose driven’ or ‘sense of mission’.

 2. OCD

Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder is characterized by a preoccupation with orderliness, perfectionism, and interpersonal control, at the expense of flexibility and openness.

Best Use: This disorder is well suited for middle management positions that require an unflinching ability to execute orders with unquestioning precision. Those exhibiting OCD are more likely to adhere to company policy where average employees might deviate in the unsanctioned pursuit of customer service or an unscheduled gain in efficiency.

 

3. Paranoid

Paranoid personality disorder is characterized by a pervasive suspiciousness and generalized mistrust of others. They perceive danger is everywhere and disregard any evidence to the contrary.

Best Use:

Those afflicted with paranoia have achieved successful careers in both Financial and Legal professions. PPD can be a debilitating disorder requiring psychiatric help and a useful tool when protecting a company from the countless enemies bent on destroying everything it stands for.

 

4. ADD

Attention deficit disorder is characterized by excessive activity and inability to concentrate on one task for any length of time.

Best Use: Individuals with ADD have a disposition best suited to a career in marketing. Our society is awash in an overwhelming flood of sales messages. Who is better suited than a marketer with ADD, to craft a campaign that has a millisecond to catch your attention? An employee with a deficit in attention can lead a company to a surplus of opportunities.

So next time you are looking for a job, embrace these disorders (and if you aren't sure whether or not you have one, here's a bunch of quizzes that can help you find out).

Grant Reinero
Grant Reinero
See Grant Reinero's Profile
Grant Reinero is an American artist, musician and writer best known for his work in advertising. His career started in San Diego’s action sports industry, designing products for famed skateboard and motorcycle companies such as Foundation, Toy Machine, Zero and Thor. At the turn of the century Reinero accepted a position at Shepard Fairey’s Obey Giant. This move represented a shift from product design to marketing on a national level. Holding the position as Creative Director at several large advertising agencies allowed Reinero to gain notoriety by winning an Addy and Webby for his work on campaigns for WD-40 and Bumble Bee Foods. In 2012 Grant became Creative Director at Business.com where he is responsible for crafting the brand’s public face.
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