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Turn It Up: Aggressive Marketing Strategies for Startups in Any Industry

business.com editorial staff
business.com editorial staff

If you've got a product ready to go, how do you market it so that you can sell as many as possible in a short amount of time?

  • Aggressive marketing is an effective tactic for startups who want to get their name out there.
  • There are several approaches you can adopt when it comes to marketing a startup and what strategies you follow will depend on your business.
  • New businesses often don't have the luxury of waiting for customers to come to them, so aggressive marketing is the only viable strategy if you're looking to get your new business off the ground.

Nothing fuels a startup like sales. Even if the product isn't perfect, selling a good product is better than forgoing sales to sell a perfect product later.

Besides, updates to a product line down the road will be a great opportunity to get some repeat business from early adopters.

Plus, new product releases represent excellent PR opportunities to build buzz and increase free market exposure. 

So, if you've got a decent product ready to go, how do you market it so that you can sell as many as possible in as short a period of time as possible?

What is aggressive marketing?

Aggressive marketing is a tactic of communicating directly with potential customers and actively pursuing their engagement with your business.

This is opposed to passive marketing where information about a product is made available, but it is up to the consumer to take action if they want to engage with your business.   

Examples of aggressive marketing

Aggressive marketing can be achieved through several different strategies. Cold-calling or emailing is probably the best example. Thus, refers to the practice of soliciting potential customers who have never engaged with your brand before to see if they would be interested in what you're offering.

Another example of aggressive marketing is assembling a street team to hand out fliers or acquire email addresses. This can be a draining practice, but it's a great way to connect with people who otherwise may not know about your company if you can handle all the rejection.

Strategies to boost your sales

Below you'll find six more strategies of aggressive marketing, designed to amp your sales from day one. 

Reach influencers and cultivate relationships

The most important people in your market are the individuals who speak to your target audience on a daily basis.

These could be TV or radio personalities, or they may be YouTube channel hosts.

Simply put, if your target customer is paying attention to them, you need to use these influencers to your advantage.

Email them, call them, offer them free products, and above all else, treat them as your best customers.

A mention from an influencer can propel your startup from a nobody to a legitimate force to be reckoned with. 

Some startups have had success negotiating market deals with influencers.

For example, Happy Feet had a great deal of success marketing their oversized sneakers and slippers by working with Jersey Shore's Snooki.

She tweeted their product out to their followers, and in return, she received a commission on every pair sold. 

Get creative and find ways to develop relationships with the influencers that your customers are paying attention to. 

Hammer home how much your product is needed 

There's a certain element of fear to any marketing campaign. It might be the fear that you're not as attractive as the model in the ad unless you buy the perfume or cologne they're wearing. Or, your home needs a home security system because X number of home robberies occur every year in your neighborhood. It's imperative, though, to stay on the right side of marketing, providing a sense of urgency without being malicious.

To do this, major retailers do weekly sales and clearances that build a sense of urgency in the buyer.

Human nature tells us that when something is less available, or only available for a limited time, we are more motivated to make a purchase quickly. 

Get the buzz going

In the world of social media, there's no such thing as bad attention. The more consumers are talking about your brand or service with their friends, publicly online, the more free advertising you're getting.

Tech-savvy companies are beginning to use a variety of marketing tactics on Instagram and other social media platforms. 

Start taking pictures around the office. Curate them into collections and type up little stories to go along with them.

Maybe one of your partners has a strong band story for why your product was created; empower them to share their story and tag your company in the post. 

Once the buzz starts, don't forget to engage. Pay close attention to what is being shared, liked and followed the most.

Once you identify the high-performing tactics that your audiences love, hammer it home with unwavering attention.

Emotion outsells logic 

According to a variety of studies, emotional advertisements are the most effective.

So, if you haven't figured it out by now, you need to get out there and pull on some heartstrings.

A Whirlpool ad that went viral emphasized the challenges a mom and dad face raising a family. For many consumers, the ad takes the viewer back, and allows them to feel a sense of nostalgia for times when parents were able to save the day and make things easier for their kids. For parents, the Whirlpool advertisement resonates that their washing machine can help make some tasks, like laundry, a little bit easier so there's more time to spend making fun family memories.   

Emotional power, influencer marketing and need-based value propositions 

When crafting your company's advertising campaigns, focus on striking an emotional tone that plays on the hopes and dreams of your audience.

If you can parlay the support of an influencer in your market, you'll reach an exponentially higher number of people.

Focus your message on why your customers absolutely need your product right now to solve a major problem in their life, and you'll find new customers rushing to open their wallets for you. 

Image Credit: Jacob Lund/Shutterstock
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