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How to Get Your Business Loan Application Approved

By Adam Uzialko,
business.com writer
|
Mar 24, 2020
Image Credit: wutwhanfoto / Getty Images
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How does a small business loan work?
How do you qualify for a small business loan?
What documentation do you need for a business loan application?
How long does it take for a small business loan to get approved?
How to make sure a small business loan is right for you
Alternative lending options offer more flexibility than banks, but at a cost
Securing a small business loan is a matter of demonstrating reliability
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Wondering how to get your business loan application approved? These steps will better position you to secure the funding to start or grow your business.

  • Qualifying for a business loan means demonstrating your ability to pay back the loan with interest in a timely manner.
  • Bring the right documentation when applying for a loan to improve your odds of securing funding.
  • Strong personal finances will also help your case when you apply for a business loan.
  • Alternative lenders offer more flexibility in approving loan applications, but usually at a higher cost.

Applying for a small business loan can be a challenging process. Not only is it important to organize your documentation, but you must also give the lender significant transparency into your business. After that, waiting to find out whether you've been approved or denied for the loan can be nerve-wracking.

But exactly how hard is it to get a small business loan? The answer might depend as much on the lender as it does on your own financial circumstances.

How does a small business loan work?

The term "small business loans" can refer to a variety of products, but it most commonly describes a term loan from a financial institution such as a bank or credit union. This type of small business loan is one of the most affordable funding options available to entrepreneurs, but it requires substantial documentation and good personal and/or business finances. The upside is that they tend to be low-interest loans from trusted lending institutions.

Small business loans often range in term from one to five years, though they can extend longer in certain cases. They could be microloans of a few thousand dollars or much more substantial loans surpassing $1 million. Generally, small business loan interest rates range from 2% to 8%, depending on the lender's requirements and the borrower's creditworthiness.

Here's an example of the structure of a typical small business loan:

  • A lender approves a borrower's loan request for $10,000.
  • The term of the loan is one year.
  • The annual percentage rate (APR) on the loan is 10%.
  • The borrower must pay back the principal amount of $10,000, plus about $550 in total interest payments over the life of the loan.
  • The loan will be repaid in 12 monthly installments of about $880.

This is a highly simplified example of a small business loan, but the general structure applies to all term loans. When you sign a loan agreement, look out for additional terms and restrictions, such as loan covenants that could trigger a default if violated. However, the bare bones of a business loan will appear similar to the above.

Another common small business loan is the U.S. Small Business Administration's 7(a) loan program. While many small business loans require a personal guarantee from the borrower, with this program, the SBA guarantees the loan. This expands the opportunity to secure funding to borrowers who would otherwise be denied for a loan. However, it takes longer to secure funding through the SBA 7(a) loan program. Generally, SBA loans range in value from $500 to $5.5 million.

 

Editor's note: Looking for a small business loan? Fill out the questionnaire below to have our vendor partners contact you about your needs.

 

How do you qualify for a small business loan?

Qualifying for a small business loan is the first step to secure funding to start or grow your business. Lenders are primarily interested in one major thing: your ability to repay the loan with interest on time. Demonstrating your ability to do so is the most important aspect of qualifying for a small business loan.

"Be ready to show a history of steady, strong cash flow or a business plan with a strong likelihood of sufficient cash flow to repay the debt," said Rob Stephens, founder of CFO Perspective.

In addition, Stephens said a healthy credit score – both personal credit and business credit – improves your odds of qualifying for a small business loan. Lenders will likely pull a credit report when you apply for a loan, which could help or harm your chances of approval.

"Maintain a good personal credit score," Stephens said. "Banks will require a personal guarantee on the debt, so good personal finances improve the odds of getting a loan. You may also need to pledge collateral or find other guarantors for the loan."

Lenders often also look at debt-to-income ratio, a measurement of how much money you are bringing in versus how much money you already owe. Your debt-to-income ratio demonstrates how leveraged your business already is, so a lower ratio suggests your business has a better ability to repay additional financing.

Of course, a lender isn't going to simply take your word for it and hand you the money. They'll need supporting documentation that shows you are truly in a position to repay the loan you are requesting. So, what should you bring along with you?

What documentation do you need for a business loan application?

Every loan application will require documentation to back up your assertions. It's important to bring whatever corroborating documentation you can to demonstrate your business's financials and history to the lender.

"To apply for a conventional small business loan, you'll first need to share all of your financial details, including your personal financial information, your future growth plans and precisely how you'll use the requested capital," said Farhan Ahmad, founder and CEO of Bento for Business.

Ahmad said it's important to come prepared when filling out an application. He recommends bringing the following documentation with you:

  • Employer Identification Number (EIN)
  • Business permits and licenses
  • Personal and business tax returns for the past three years
  • Any bankruptcies or bounced checks
  • Personal and business credit scores
  • Annual profit and revenue
  • Statement of disclosure of debt
  • Copies of commercial leases
  • Personal and business bank statements

"Some applications will require even more information," Ahmad said. "Generally speaking, low-cost, long-term loans have more paperwork than high-cost, short-term ones."

How long does it take for a small business loan to get approved?

Once you've filled out your application and submitted your documentation, the lender will consider you for approval. Depending on the lender, you might have to do a bit of waiting. The lender will examine your financial statements – including your annual revenue, tax returns and existing loan amounts – to determine whether your business can financially support new debt. They will also consider your credit history and ensure you meet their minimum credit score, a threshold which varies by lender. All of this can take some time.

"If you're applying through a bank, you'll then need to pay the application fee and wait for a period of two to four weeks to see if you've been approved," Ahmad said. "This might seem like a long time, but loans through the Small Business Administration can take even longer to get approved – sometimes 90 days or longer." 

For businesses that don't have much of a history, securing a small business term loan can be difficult. Lenders often base their decisions largely on track record, so, without much of a financial past to examine, newer small businesses are in a difficult spot. However, strong personal finances, personal guarantees and the right collateral could increase your chances of securing a loan. Of course, that puts additional pressure on your business to successfully repay the loan plus interest. 

How to make sure a small business loan is right for you

In some cases, small business owners are so eager for funding they accept a loan that isn't suitable for their needs. Before applying for a loan, you should understand why you need it and how much funding you require. Loans are important tools in the entrepreneur's arsenal, but if they aren't managed wisely and strategically, they could become an undue financial burden. Take the steps to ensure a small business loan is right for you before accepting the money, making it a mutually beneficial situation for you and the lender.

"Before you apply for a small business loan, ask yourself why you need the loan," Ahmad said. "Is it for day-to-day expenses like inventory and employee salaries? Are you a first-time entrepreneur in your first year of business, in need of a startup business loan? Are you hoping to expand your business, perhaps by adding another location? Or do you just need a safety cushion?

"From there, you can figure out what type of loan will best meet your needs," he added. "For example, for day-to-day expenses, you might need a smaller loan with a longer repayment period, but for expansion, you might require a larger loan with a shorter repayment period." 

Of course, the other consideration that should be top of mind is how you will pay back any loan you accept. Small businesses that don't have a repayment strategy based on their true financial metrics could run into debt trouble.

"To make sure you're able to pay back a loan on time, I recommend setting up an airtight budget for business expenses," Ahmad said. "If you keep close track of how much money you'll need each month for all of your expenses – from inventory to paychecks to electrical bills – you'll be better prepared to set aside the requisite repayment amount each month, and therefore more likely to pay it back on time."

In the event you are forced to make a late payment, he added, it is beneficial to know the details of your lender's late payment policy.

Alternative lending options offer more flexibility than banks, but at a cost

If you need funding more quickly than the weeks or months a conventional loan takes, there are other options. However, most of the alternative lenders that provide fast approval and funding charge higher rates. Small business owners considering working with an alternative lender should balance the importance of speed versus cost.

Alternative lenders come in many varieties; many offer multiple products, such as bridge loans, invoice factoring and cash advances. It's important to understand the ins and outs of each financing type before you decide which method of funding might be right for your business. Review our guide to alternative lending to find out more about the types of alternative loans available to your business.

Alternative lenders, sometimes called online lenders, generally offer a simple application process for flexible loans. They also generally have a faster turnaround than banks and credit unions, and more latitude when it comes to application approval. The drawbacks are that alternative loans are generally more expensive. They also tend to be short-term loans, meaning you'll likely have to pay higher installments than you would with a conventional bank loan.

Securing a small business loan is a matter of demonstrating reliability

If you need a small business loan and have a good personal or business credit score, thorough financial documentation, a history of strong cash flow, and a manageable debt-to-income ratio, you should have little trouble getting approved. For businesses lacking in any of these areas, it might be more challenging to secure a small business loan, but with the right documentation and guarantees, it is still possible.

If you find yourself in a position where it's not likely you will secure a conventional small business loan, you could consider an alternative lender. However, remember that alternative lenders typically charge much higher rates, so ask yourself if it's really necessary before you take out a loan.

Securing any loan is a matter of demonstrating reliability to the lender. If you can show you have the ability to pay back your loan with interest in the allotted timeframe, your application will likely be approved on the first pass.

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Adam Uzialko
Adam Uzialko
See Adam Uzialko's Profile
Freelance editor at business.com. Responsible for managing freelance budget, editing freelance and contributor content, and drafting original articles. Also creates product and service reviews to assist business.com readers in buying decisions for their businesses. VP and co-founder of CannaContent, a digital marketing company dedicated to the cannabis, hemp, and CBD industries. Focused specifically on the content marketing arm of the company, creating blogs, press releases, and website copy for clients spanning the entire supply chain. Avid fan and indispensable ally of the feline species. Music lover, middling guitarist, and unprompted vocalist. Miniature painter who loves sci-fi and fantasy. Armchair political philosopher with a tendency to read old books written by men with unusually large beards. Ask me about all things writing!
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